A world in blue




Blue photos

Blue is the colour of the clear sky and the deep sea. On the optical spectrum, blue is located between violet and green.

Blue and the Impressionist painters

The invention of new synthetic pigments in the 18th and 19th centuries considerably brightened and expanded the palette of painters. J.M.W. Turner experimented with the new cobalt blue, and of the twenty colours most used by the Impressionists, twelve were new and synthetic colours, including cobalt blue, ultramarine and cerulean blue.

Another important influence on painting in the 19th century was the theory of complementary colours, developed by the French chemist Michel Eugene Chevreul in 1828 and published in 1839. He demonstrated that placing complementary colours, such as blue and yellow-orange or ultramarine and yellow, next to each other heightened the intensity of each colour “to the apogee of their tonality.” In 1879 an American physicist, Ogden Rood, published a book charting the complementary colours of each colour in the spectrum. This principle of painting was used by Claude Monet in his Impression – Sunrise – Fog (1872), where he put a vivid blue next to a bright orange sun, (1872) and in Régate à Argenteuil (1872), where he painted an orange sun against blue water. The colours brighten each other. Renoir used the same contrast of cobalt blue water and an orange sun in Canotage sur la Seine (1879–1880). Both Monet and Renoir liked to use pure colours, without any blending.

Monet and the impressionists were among the first to observe that shadows were full of colour. In his La Gare Saint-Lazare, the grey smoke, vapour and dark shadows are actually composed of mixtures of bright pigment, including cobalt blue, cerulean blue, synthetic ultramarine, emerald green, Guillet green, chrome yellow, vermilion and ecarlate red. Blue was a favorite colour of the impressionist painters, who used it not just to depict nature but to create moods, feelings and atmospheres. Cobalt blue, a pigment of cobalt oxide-aluminium oxide, was a favourite of Auguste Renoir and Vincent van Gogh. It was similar to smalt, a pigment used for centuries to make blue glass, but it was much improved by the French chemist Louis Jacques Thénard, who introduced it in 1802. It was very stable but extremely expensive. Van Gogh wrote to his brother Theo, “‘Cobalt is a divine colour and there is nothing so beautiful for putting atmosphere around things…”

Van Gogh described to his brother Theo how he composed a sky: “The dark blue sky is spotted with clouds of an even darker blue than the fundamental blue of intense cobalt, and others of a lighter blue, like the bluish white of the Milky Way….the sea was very dark ultramarine, the shore a sort of violet and of light red as I see it, and on the dunes, a few bushes of prussian blue.”

Source : Wikipedia

All photography below are copyrighted by their authors – Click on photos to see each license.

Thumbnail photography is CC licensed by kk+

#1
Blue photography
By  angus clyne

#2
Reminisce
By   Emmanuel_D.Photography

#3
Cherry blossom galaxy
By   masahiro miyasaka

#4
The Flirt
By  Ionut Iordache

#5
Happy Birthday to my dearest friend Thao Hien!
By  JannaPham

#6
Blue Me Around A Tree
By  Fort Photo

#7
I've reached the end of the world
By  Stuck in Customs

#8
20050815-vs-0110
By  Made in Madeira

#9
pick a boat any boat
By  lomokev

#10
Blue
By Bahman Farzad





Comments

comments