Point and Shoots Vs. EVIL And DSLR Cameras




Point and Shoots Vs. EVIL and DSLR Cameras

Digital cameras have become the norm in terms of the equipment most photographers use. From the simple point and click camera that is perfect for beginners to the high tech digital cameras that cost thousands of dollars, there is something for every need, talent, and skill level. Whether you are looking for a camera to take breath-taking landscape shots, killer portraits, or professional grade architecture photos, you need a good camera in order to get those shots. Whether you are using the high end, top of the line camera and lenses or the simple and affordable camera sets, you can get good quality photographs.

Point and Shoots Vs. EVIL And DSLR Cameras

Point and Shoots

Once the standard for digital photos, the market for these cameras is slowly being replaced by advances in phone camera technology. Despite this, there are still many who rely on its camera type for their photography needs.  With skill and little creative photo shooting, point and shoot cameras can take stunningly beautiful photographs. Let’s take a look at the pros and cons of this camera type.

Pros:

  • Easy to use. Geared towards novices.
  • Largest range of size options, which allows for small and large files for digital sharing or high res printing.
  • Most of these cameras offer a very large zoom range.

Cons:

  • Lack of/poor manual controls.
  • Hard to use for people with large hands because of their compact size and smaller panels and buttons
  • Poor audio quality in video recording mode.
  • New versions are produced almost as often as computers, so any model will quickly become obsolete.

EVIL Camera

EVIL stands for electronic viewfinder with interchangeable lenses. It is used to describe a camera that lies somewhere between a point and shoot and a DSLR. Like a point and shoot, they are compact and easy to handle and quick to learn on. These cameras are portable and yet also offer a higher quality of imaging than most Point and Shoot cameras. Let’s take a look at the pros and cons of this camera type.

Pros:

  • Portable size and design without sacrificing any of the image quality and resolution settings.
  • Interchangeable lenses, good zoom range, good in all light levels, and has better video output than most point and shoots.
  • Setting and controls are easy to understand and offer many personalizing options for photos.
  • Fairly high resale value even after a few years.

Cons:

  • Won’t fit in your pocket.
  • No proper viewfinder, only digital display screen in most cases.
  • Accessories like flashes and viewfinders generally do not come standard and cost extra.
  • In some cases you’ll be paying as much or more than a DSLR and that added cost is primarily due to the camera’s diminutive size.

DSLR Cameras

While DSLRs may not be the most practical camera to lug around with you wherever you go, they take some of the most amazing photographs. If quality is the ultimate goal and is far above everything else on your list of want and needs, you will want a DSLR camera. They offer so much control and customization that you have practically no limits on what you can accomplish on the technical end and it gives you far more freedom and options in terms of your photography. Let’s take a look at the pros and cons of this camera type.

Pros:

  • Superior image quality, many great control and option features, interchangeable and customizable lenses and accessories.
  • Complete control over all technical aspects of your image.
  • Many models offer HD TV-quality video recording options.
  • Allows for both manual and automatic or semi automatic features.
  • DSLR models are replaced infrequently, so your camera will not be obsolete in 2 or 3 years like with other cameras.
  • You can buy just the camera or just the lens or just the flash casing- allowing you options to customize your camera to fit your needs.

Cons:

  • Often big and bulky, or at least they’re the largest type of camera you can buy.
  • You will need to bring the camera, all your lenses, flashes, and other accessories with you, which can be cumbersome and heavy if you are lugging it around all day.
  • The wide range settings and buttons make for a much steeper learning curve than any other camera type, and even moving from one model or brand within the DSLR family can present a learning curve.
  • Video recording has either poor or limited features and is not the camera’s strongest feature.

Whatever camera type you ultimately decide to go with depends on which features are most important to you.  Reading reviews by professional photographers is a good way to get an unbiased opinion of a specific camera before you buy it. For the hobby photographer, the lightweight cameras cover the scope of casual photography. The professional will prefer the added features and control offered by DSLRs.  Look at your needs and wants and what type of photography you want to take.   Going with a cheaper camera may save you money up front but may cost you in lost profits from poorer quality work.  Likewise, buying the most expensive camera will not guarantee great photography sales if you cannot master the camera and use it to your advantage.

 




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